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5 TYPES OF VEGETABLES YOU SHOULD CONSIDER

Doing grocery shopping i an amazing thing to fill the stock in your house,. Whereas some prefer buying less products just for one time consumption, others buy a stock that will last for a month or more. Here are 5 best Vegetables you can invest in for your diet.
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1. SPINACH
This green has healthy amounts of vitamins C, A, and K as well as manganese. Working 1.5 cups of green, leafy vegetables into your day may lower your odds of getting type 2 diabetes. Cooking tip: Sneak spinach into your daily routine by adding it to scrambled eggs and casseroles or blending it into smoothies.
2. BROCOLLI
Broccoli is one of nature’s rock stars. It’s a top source of natural plant chemicals shown to help lower the risk of some cancers (though many other things also affect your cancer risk). Each cup of the florets also gives you plenty of vitamins C and K. Cooking tip: Steam the florets for a simple side dish. Or add them into stir-fries, frittatas, and even smoothies that also have naturally sweet things, like fruit, to mask the broccoli taste.
3. KALES
Packed with nutrients like beta-carotene, vitamin C, and bone-building vitamin K, kale has been billed as an ultimate super food. Not everyone likes its strong flavor. Enter up-and-coming baby kale. The immature kale leaves are deliciously tender and don’t require any chopping. Cooking tip: Look for baby kale packed in plastic containers alongside baby spinach in supermarkets. Use in wraps, salads, and pasta dishes.
4. RED PAPER
You think of it as a veggie, but it’s actually a fruit. One medium pepper delivers B vitamins, beta carotene, and more than twice your daily need for vitamin C. Cooking tip: For a fanciful main dish, cut the tops off peppers, remove the inner white membranes and seeds, and then roast until tender. Finish by filling with your favorite whole-grain salad.
5. SWISS CHARD
Two main varieties of Swiss chard are found on store shelves: one with multicolored stems and veins, often called rainbow chard, and another with white stems and veins. Both are great sources of lutein and zeaxanthin, an antioxidant duo that’s good for your eyes. At only 7 calories a cup for raw chard, the green giant is waistline-friendly, too. Cooking tip: To preserve its nutritional might, lightly steam chard and toss with vinaigrette. You can also use the leaves instead of tortillas when making soft tacos.

 

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